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Obituaries

Ian Davison

On Christmas Day 2016, Ian Davison died. One of Scotland's most prolific and able songmakers in the traditional style, Ian, born in Glasgow in 1939, was captured for the Scottish Folk Revival by a 1957 lecture given in Glasgow’s Partick Burgh Halls by Norman Buchan, one of the three key kick-starters of the Revival. Ian went on to co-found the Glasgow University Folk Club, then to teach English with Norman in Rutherglen Academy, and co-run the Academy’s very influential folk club.

Angus R Grant - 1967-2016

It is with deep sadness we announce that Angus R Grant passed away on 9th October after a short illness. We would like to thank his doctors and the team from St Columba’s Hospice who enabled him to die peacefully at home surrounded by family and close friends. Here follows a short appreciation.

Dave Swarbrick - 5th April 1941 - 3rd June 2016

Much has been written and is still to be written about Dave Swarbrick. He was a giant figure making an impact from his first appearances as a teenager through to very recent times. His influence on Folk Rock was huge, but his most enduring musical relationship was his partnership with Martin Carthy. His musical story is well documented including features in previous issues of The Living Tradition.

Steve McGrail

Steve McGrail, who contributed to The Living Tradition both many articles and editorially for many years until 2010, died after a long illness on 11th May 2016. He had to face early onset Alzheimer’s which he did with dignity and realism. On behalf of the magazine he had interviewed a wide range of singers and instrumentalists from all over the British Isles and Eire.

Duncan MacLennan - 1937-2016

Duncan MacLennan, founder member and driving force behind Inverness Folk Club and Folk Festival for many years, died quietly on February 1st in Raigmore Hospital after a long illness.

Larry Kearns - died 28 May 2016

We are sad to hear of the death, on Sat May 28th, of Larry Kearns, original mandolin player with the Oldham Tinkers Folk Group from Lancashire. He had been suffering from cancer for the last few months, and died in Dr Kershaw's Hospice in Oldham, his home town. Although Larry was still active musically at local sessions, he hadn't played with the group for the last 25 years, having taken a step back due to a hand condition which resulted in his being replaced by Mancunian multi-instrumentalist Dave Howard.

Andy Macgregor Stewart - 8 September 1952 – 27 December 2015

The death of Andy M. Stewart on December 27th 2015 has taken from us not just an immensely talented songwriter and performer, but also one of the country’s last remaining traditional singers.

Roy Harris

Remembering Roy Harris

A personal tribute by Pete Castle

I was really pleased to be asked to write this appreciation of Roy Harris who I have described as my best mate and my mentor. I could have written a normal, factual obituary, putting in all the dates and achievements, but anyone could do that and it wouldn’t do Roy justice so, instead, I thought I’d write a personal account of our relationship. Being personal, it will paint a slightly different picture to that which others of you might have produced but I think a lot of you, particularly if you are a performer, will find a lot to identify with.

Joyce Cann

Tributes were paid to Joyce Cann, president of the Dartmoor Folk Festival and wife of the event founder, the late Bob Cann, at her funeral service held at St Andrew's Church in South Tawton.

Andrew Knight 1949 - 2016

The third of four sons to John and Betty Knight, Andrew was born and raised in Banstead, Surrey. He was introduced to Irish folksong when elder brothers Simon and Chris, together with friends, started a weekly singing session in The Black Horse in Reigate and other pubs in the region. Soon his younger brother Patrick, with whom Andrew was to play traditional dance music for the rest of his life, joined the throng. This was the mid-sixties and the material embraced songs from the hugely popular Dubliners as well as The Clancy Brothers, Pete Seeger, Joan Baez and others. Every Saturday night, rebel songs and street ballads were belted out in unison to guitar and banjo accompaniment.