Jack Rutter

The chances are that anyone attending a folk festival this summer will probably have seen Jack Rutter making an appearance somewhere along the line. Perhaps best known as the final name in the young traditional and mainly instrumental group, Moore Moss Rutter, this is the year that Jack has progressed from being well-known as a guitar player and one third of a group, to a multi-instrumentalist solo artist with a CD of his own and a string of bookings. There have also been a number of collaborations that has meant that, at times, he seems to have been everywhere all at once.

Rowan Piggott - next generation

Rowan Piggott is the fiddle-playing and singing son of Charlie Piggott of De Danann fame.  He is currently making a name for himself around the folk scene in England as a solo musician and also as a member of the Georgia Lewis Band and as half of a duo with Rosie Hodgson.  He is the next generation, not just of a family of musicians, but he is also part of the next generation of folk musicians, festival and club goers, working in the scene and making it their own.

Will Pound - Through The Seasons

Not many people who are known primarily as a folk artist can claim to have played on a number one record in the charts. Even one nominated three times for the coveted BBC Folk Awards ‘Musician of the Year’. However, Will Pound played the opening harmonica riff on one such record. He Ain't Heavy He's My Brother, by the Justice Collective, was recorded to raise money for the various charities associated with the Hillsborough families. It reached the highly coveted Christmas Number One spot in 2012.

Alan Rose & Lynda Hardcastle - A Yorkshire Twosome

Although they have both been singing professionally for over 40 years, this married couple has only just released a first album together that covers their performing career and beyond.  Readers of The Living Tradition might recognise Alan’s name from the many reviews he’s written for the magazine over the years.  Nigel Schofield decided to find out why it’s taken them so long to get around to their much-anticipated debut release.

Lankum - the artists formerly known as Lynched!

Dublin is one of those cities that just hits you.  From the minute you arrive, you know you are in the capital: the iconic sights, sounds and smells; the creamy pints; the many bridges crossing the Liffey; the thick accents.  When you arrive in Dublin, you just know you couldn’t be anywhere else.  Just as distinctive is some of the music emanating from its inhabitants and, at the moment, perhaps none more so than Lankum (formerly Lynched).

Mairead Ni Mhaonaigh - It's In The Blood Fiona Heywood Tue, 05/30/2017 - 18:45
If there is one person who has brought the traditional music of Donegal onto a world stage in recent years, it is Mairéad Ní Mhaonaigh.  Born and reared in the Gaeltacht area of Gaoth Dobhair (Gweedore) in Donegal, she has travelled the world for over 30 years, bringing along with her a wealth of traditional tunes and songs from her native county, much of which she learned from her own family and neighbours, in particular from her father, the late Francie Ó Maonaigh.
Muireann Nic Amhlaoibh - Closer to Home Fiona Heywood Sat, 04/29/2017 - 18:39
Muireann Nic Amhlaoibh is a singer and flute player immersed in the vibrant traditions of the West Kerry area.  After studying traditional music at UL, she joined Irish band Danú and performed all over the world with them for 13 years.  Since leaving their ranks in 2015 after having two children, life has been somewhat different for Muireann, but it certainly has not been the end of her musical road.  We met up with her to find out more about life after Danú.

Chief of a Cornish Clan - Nigel Schofield discusses the delayed debut of Geoff Lakeman

Folk music has always had performers who could justly lay claim to the title of ‘First Family of Folk’ - The Carters, The Coppers, The Waterson:Carthys… In the 21st century, that crown could surely pass to The Lakemans (should that be Lakemen?) – Seth, Sean and his wife Kathryn Roberts, and Sam and his wife Cara Dillon.

Eliza Carthy - in conversation with Trevor Buck

Eliza Carthy - in conversation with Trevor Buck

I called Eliza at her home outside Fylingdales near Scarborough in the middle of a busy day.

“You know what it’s like when you’ve got to pack for a flight the next day; your mind won’t rest. Well, my brain has been racing all night.  I was up at 5am. I’m driving to Edinburgh this afternoon to pick the others up (including Karine Polwart, Mary Macmaster and Jenn Butterworth) for an intensive week of rehearsing and recording up on Eigg, an island in the Hebrides.”

It’s about songs on Eigg. Are you taking instruments?